Archives for January 2018

CMP 1911 Update

The CMP has been authorized to receive 8,000 model 1911 pistols from the United States Army.

The models 1911 have been received by the CMP. A complete inventory will be conducted over the course of this week. The pistols will then be securely stored until the Army-approved 1911 building and armory infrastructure is completed. That completion is anticipated to be approximately 60 days from now. Once the 1911 armory is completed, inspection, grading, repair, and ultimately test firing of the pistols will begin. (Please be aware that the CMP was led to believe that they were ready to move forward, but three weeks ago facility requirements were changed, and they are now fulfilling those requirements.)

The CMP 1911 order packet will be posted 90 days prior to the order acceptance date and opening sales date. No orders will be accepted prior to that date. CMP customer service has been inundated with calls and emails concerning the 1911s and no further information is available at this time.

Former LSA Director Ray Asprion Dead at 81

Sad news reached us here at the LSA on January 22, 2018 with the passing of former LSA Director and LSA Life Member Raymond (Ray) M. Asprion, Jr.  Ray was a long time competitor in the discipline of High Power Rifle and was responsible for bringing many new shooters into the sport.  He was an enormous presence in the Louisiana shooting world and was a tireless supporter of Louisianians’ Right to Keep and Bear Arms.  In addition to his work for the LSA and shooting in the state, Ray was one of the original volunteers at the WWII Museum. In particular, he was one of the boat builders instrumental in the building/restoration of the Higgins LCVP, LCP (L), and the PT-305.

Ray’s complete obituary can be read here.

Ray will be very much missed and we offer his family and friends our heartfelt condolences.

Nyala with a Handgun in Mozambique

Poen Van Zyl of Zambeze Delta Safaris was standing 15 feet above me atop a vegetation-strewn termite mound surveying the abandoned garden through a well used pair of binoculars.  The local tribesmen that call the famed Coutada 11 of Mozambique home practice slash and burn farming, clearing enormous areas in the forest and then abandoning those areas after one or two years of use.  The forest was quickly reclaiming the area with vegetation, and the constant hum of tens of thousands of bees signaled that many of the plants in the area were flowering.  It was mid-July and the weather had been unseasonably cool and wet, but had turned warm and humid, typical for winter in costal Mozambique.

In addition to bees, the local antelope also visit these abandoned gardens. We were looking for an old mature bull Nyala that Poen knew frequented this particular garden.   The unmistakable trumpet of an elephant rang out and Will Fawcett and I locked eyes. In addition to being a friend, Will is a professional hunter with Numzaan Safaris in South Africa and joined me as an observer on this safari in Mozambique. The details of this adventure had been made at the 2016 Safari Club International (SCI) Convention in Las Vegas. The plan had been for Will and me to hunt in Mozambique for two weeks, then fly back from Beira, Mozambique to Johannesburg, drive down to the Freestate to pick up a couple of species I had missed on my first safari to R.S.A. in 2014, and then finish the trip with a couple of days in Limpopo.

Will and I smiled at one another nervously.  Elephants in the area could spell trouble and that elephant sounded close.  The elephants in Mozambique are survivors of several civil wars and are not particularly fond of humans.  In fact, one could say they are downright aggressive.  I imagined a scenario in which we found the old bull about the same time that the elephants ambled into the garden.  I tend to have that kind of luck.  To compound the problem, I was the only person with a firearm, and it was a revolver.  I had absolutely no interest in trying to turn an angry charge with a revolver.

Poen looked down and waved Will up.  Will labored up the termite mound and then Poen and he whispered and pointed while they formed a plan.    From the ground out of earshot, I took the planning as a good sign.  Perhaps the old bull was in the garden.  After an eternity while I watched the afternoon sun inexorably dip toward the western horizon, Will and Poen came down to my level and laid out the plan.  There were five bulls in the garden.  The closest one was immature and alone.  Several dozen yards deeper into the garden were three mature, but young bulls.  All three of them were shooters, but none of them were the “proper” bull.  The old man we were after was about 150 or so yards from us, close to the edge of the garden where it disappears into the forest.  To compound our problems, the elephants were close and would not tolerate our presence in the garden and the sun was very low in the western sky.  “Perfect,” I thought.

As quietly as possible, we began to move toward the old bull trying desperately to skirt around the younger bulls as not to alert the old bull to our presence.  Luckily, baboons frequent these gardens as well, and the noise that stalking hunters make pales in comparison to the noise a troop of hungry baboons can produce.  Despite our best efforts, the immature bull spotted us and sounded the alarm.  The older group of three bulls began to move away from our location and, unfortunately, we had lost sight of the oldest bull as we began the stalk.  With faith as our only indication that the old bull was still in the area, we stuck to our plan and moved forward.  Suddenly, Poen’s tracker, Gotchi (pronounced goat-chee and meaning piglet in Zulu) froze.  Through years of hunting as a pair, Gotchi and Poen communicated with no words exchanged.  Gotchi set up my shooting sticks and Poen slid to a position just to the right of them.

“Can you see him?”

“No.  How far?”

Poen’s tone was urgent.  “He’s right there.  No more than 70-80 yards.”  The big old bull turned his head and the motion caught my eye.  His old gray coat blended in perfectly with the surroundings.

“Got him.”  I put the Freedom Arms Model 83 chambered in .454 Casull onto the cradle in the shooting sticks and looked through the scope.  I had set the scope on it’s lowest power knowing through hard experience that spot and stalk hunting with a pistol is nigh on impossible with anything but the lowest power settings. I kept both eyes open and looked past the scope at the bull, aligning the pistol with him as to have any chance of seeing him through the scope.  The crosshairs settled on his left shoulder, but he was facing away and the angle was severe.  This was not a good shot and certainly not one I was going to take.

“Do you have a clear shot?”

“Not yet.”

“Okay.  Don’t rush it.  He’ll turn if you give him a chance.”

Time ticked by as the sun marched further to the west.  I kept the pistol aimed at the bull but kept both eyes open as not to get eye strain waiting on him to turn.  Clearly, he was not concerned by the closeness of the elephants or the setting sun.  Neither was he concerned about the long walk we would have through the forest to get to the clearing where we had left Poen’s truck an hour before.

Finally, the old bull turned presenting me with an excellent slightly angled shot on his left shoulder.  I cocked the single action pistol, aligned the crosshairs, settled my breath, and began to squeeze the trigger.  The recoil from the .454 Casull is substantial, and one can easily jerk the trigger in anticipation of the crushing recoil that follows the shot.  The only cure for this is practice, and a lot of it.  The revolver roared to life and I heard the unmistakable smack of the Hornady 300 grain XTP-MAG as it connected.  He trotted a few yards away, and I was able to put a second shot into his right shoulder.  After receiving the second shot, he tried to escape to the relative safety of the invading forest, but fortunately, did not make it.

As we were taking the photos of this magnificent trophy, I heard a strange noise from the edge of the garden.  “What was that?”

Poen looked up from the camera.  “That is the rumbling of an elephant’s stomach!”

He measured 74 1/8” and ranked number 6 with a handgun in the SCI Record Book.  To say I had amazing success in Mozambique would be a vast understatement. In Coutada 11, I harvested seven SCI Top-10 species with handguns (Common Nyala, number 6; Lichtenstein Hartebeest, number 7; Chobe Bushbuck, number 7; Natal Red Duiker, number 6; and Blue Duiker, number 5, as well as the new potential number 18 overall Livingstone Suni, which should rank number 5 with a handgun when certified by a SCI master measurer.

The LSA, the CMP, and Ordering M1911 Pistols

The recent announcement by the Civilian Marksmanship Program that they MAY obtain surplus Model of 1911 pistols for sale to the public has sparked a tremendous amount of interest by collectors and shooters alike.  If you have ordered rifles from the CMP in the past, you may think you're an "old hat" at this sort of thing, but think again.  The CMP plans to sell the M1911 pistols through a very different mechanism than their rifle sales.  So, if you're an old hat or brand new to purchasing firearms from the CMP, read on.

But first let me answer one of the most common questions.  Yes, being a member of the LSA satisfies the requirement to be a member of a CMP-affiliated club.

The CMP now has a dedicated page on their website for information on M1911 sales.  Here is a synopsis of some decisions that have already been made if the CMP were to ever receive them from the United States Army.

  1. It's not a done deal! Although it appears to be highly likely, the US Government has NOT finalized the approval through congress, so the CMP does not currently have the M1911 pistols in their warehouses and definitely does not have permission to sale surplus M1911 pistols to the public.
  2. There will be a whole new system. The CMP plays by different rules than a standard Federal Firearms License (FFL) holder.  A standard FFL dealer could not directly send a rifle to your home mailing address, but the CMP can mail that M1 Garand directly to you.  However, the CMP will not be able to send a M1911 to your home address, because it is a pistol.
    • The CMP will have an all-new M1911 order form, M1911 purchasing instructions, a M1911 page on their web site, a dedicated M1911 FFL fax number and email address for the FFL holder to send their FFL with customer's name attached.
    • The customer will have to send in a complete new order packet with all new qualifying criteria included. Everyone will be a new customer, everyone starts with no advantage or disadvantage. "CMP 1911" is an FFL-governed operation and is a separate entity from CMP and has to have its own record keeping operation with no ties to the old CMP records. So, if you've order from the CMP in the past, your CMP Customer Number will do you no good.  You'll soon have both a CMP Customer Number and a CMP 1911 Customer Number.
  3. You will have to re-qualify (or qualify if new to this) to purchase firearms. Potential purchasers will have to provide to the CMP a new set of documents exhibiting: 1) proof of U.S. Citizenship, 2) proof of membership in a CMP-affiliated club, 3) proof of participation in a marksmanship activity, 4) a new form 2A with notary, 5) a signed copy of the 01, or 02, or 07 Federal Firearms License through which the M1911 will be transferred to you. From the volume of phone calls and emails I've received since this announcement, "proof of participation in a marksmanship activity" has many people baffled.  Here are some things that might help you understand this requirement.
    • You must provide proof of participation in a marksmanship related activity or otherwise show familiarity with the safe handling of firearms and range procedures.
    • Your marksmanship related activity does not have to be with a M1911 pistol; it can be with small bore rifles, high power rifles, pistols, air guns or shotguns.
    • Proof of marksmanship participation can be provided by documenting any of the following:
      • Current or past military or law enforcement service.
      • Participation in a rifle, pistol, air gun or shotgun competition (provide copy of results bulletin).
      • Completion of a marksmanship clinic that included live fire training (provide a copy of the certificate of completion or a statement from the instructor).
      • Distinguished, Instructor, or Coach status.
      • Concealed Carry License.
      • Firearms Owner Identification Card that includes live fire training.
      • FFL or C&R license.
      • Completion of a Hunter Safety Course that included live fire training.
      • Certification from range or club official or law enforcement officer witnessing shooting activity. A form for use in completing and certifying your r ange firing can be downloaded from the CMP web site here.
      • No proof of marksmanship required if over age 60.
  4. They don't know what they'll be selling! Since the US Army has not transferred the M1911 pistols to the CMP, they have not graded them yet.  Decisions concerning the grade and pricing of the M1911 pistols will not be made until inspection has occurred of a substantial quantity that will take an estimated 150 days post receipt. The CMP will price at fair market value in accordance with CMP's enabling legislation.
  5. If you want every variant of the M1911, it will take a while. Qualified CMP customers will only be allowed to purchase one 1911 per calendar year.
  6. Your Curio and Relics FFL (Type 03 FFL) is no stinking good here. M1911 pistols purchased from the CMP cannot be transferred to 03 FFL license. The BATFE and the United States Army prefer that TWO NICS checks be performed on each customer: one by the CMP, and one by an FFL dealer during the final transfer.
  7. Why two NICS checks? First Reason:  The first NICS check makes sure the customer can legally possess the M1911 pistol prior to shipping it to the local 01, or 02, or 07 FFL dealer.  The CMP, Congress, and the United States Army do not want the M1911 to have to be shipped back to CMP 1911 if the purchaser is not legal to possess.  The more in transit the pistol is, the more likely it could be lost or stolen.  The second NICS check is performed by the local 01, or 02, or 07 FFL in accordance with their standard transfer procedures. Second Reason:  CMP’s enabling legislation mandated by Congress specifies that the purchaser “successfully pass a thorough and complete background check,” i.e. NICS.  CMP cannot turn any firearm over to the purchaser until it receives a “proceed” from NICS. The local FFL can turn the pistol over after 72 business hours have elapsed if they have not heard back from NICS.  Turning the pistol over after 72 hours and not getting a “proceed” does not satisfy CMP’s enabling legislation mandated by Congress.  This leaves CMP no choice but to have a NICS check done and get a “proceed” to satisfy its enabling legislation, before shipping to the local 01, or 02, or 07 FFL.

Once the CMP gets permission from Congress to sale the surplus M1911 pistols, they will post this information on their web site.  As soon as the LSA learns this date, we'll let our members know.  Until that time, keep your fingers crossed!

No Guns = No Money

 

We’ve all seen the signs on the door. The uninformed shop owner does not want firearms in his establishment. As law-abiding gun owners, we pass his shop in favor of a more enlightened merchant, but we have that awful feeling in our gut that makes us want to educate the uniformed.

As a Louisiana Concealed Handgun Permit Holder, I
• have NOT been convicted of a felony,
• have NOT been committed for the abuse of a controlled dangerous substance, am NOT an unlawful user of marijuana, depressants, stimulants, or narcotic drugs, and do NOT chronically and habitually use alcoholic beverages,
• have NOT been adjudicated to be mentally deficient or been committed to a mental institution,
• have NOT been found guilty of a crime of violence,
• am NOT a fugitive from justice, and
• HAVE been trained by a Certified Firearms Instructor
How much does that shop owner know about his other customers, particularly that criminal that could care less about his wishes and carries an illegally concealed weapon?

Now, you may download a PDF file that will allow you to print business sized cards with this exact message on them. Simply print, trim, and carry them with you in your wallet or purse. When you see the sign in the window, slip the card to the owner and go on your way. If the owner gets enough of these cards, he’ll realize the amount of money he is losing to his uninformed and ill-conceived policy.

Instructions for Use:

To use the form, click here to download the file. Once you have downloaded the PDF, you may print the cards on plain paper or card stock, and trim along the lines. Alternatively, you may purchase any plain colored business card templates made by Avery (available at most office supply stores), and use the PDF template to print onto Avery business cards.

Please remember, be polite when presenting these cards. If the shop owner wants to argue, walk away. If the shop owners wants more information, you may direct him to the LSA for more information.